DEANZA SPRINGS RESORT

Hiking & Trails

Image
Image
Image
Image

Trail Precautions:

  • This area is a cell phone dead zone. It has been reported that a majority of the backcountry trails have no cell service at all. In the event of an emergency, please keep in mind.
  • Rattlesnakes are native to this area. During the warm weather months, rattlesnakes are much more active, however, they can be witnessed at any time of the year.
  • Carry a compass. Even if you feel you have an excellent sense of direction, it is highly recommended. A few of the detailed trail descriptions give cardinal directions and it is imperative to have a compass to navigate.

Hiking Guidelines:

  • Carry plenty of water for the duration you intend to hike.
  • The sun can be very intense here in the southern California inland high desert, so be sure to wear suitable attire, hat, sunglasses and sunscreen.
  • Dogs are allowed on trails, however, dogs must be leashed and cleaned up after at ALL times.
  • Due to uneven ground and sharp cactus & cholla on the trails, it is recommended to wear hiking boots or trail hiking shoes.
  • Picking flowers or plants on the property of De Anza, Anza-Borrego State Park or Bureau of Land Management BLM is strictly prohibited.
DeAnza Springs Resort

Hiking & Trails

Who piled up all those rocks? Our trails will lead you through a jumble of stacked boulders that defy gravity, while creating bizarre shapes and formations left to the imagination. The rock piles began underground eons ago as a result of volcanic activity. Magma, in this case a molten form of monzo-granite, rose from deep within the Earth. As it rose, it intruded into the overlying rock, the Pinto gneiss formation. As the granite cooled and crystallized underground, cracks formed horizontally and vertically. The granite continued to lift, where contact with groundwater caused angular granite blocks, widening cracks and rounded edges. Eventually, the soil eroded, leaving heaps of monzogranite scattered across this unique high desert landscape.

Image
Image
DeAnza Trailheads

Explore the Wild!

From any of our resort trailheads, within minutes you are in the Anza-Borrego State Park and Bureau of Land Management BLM Land.

  • Carrizo Trailhead
  • Temple Peak Trailhead
  • Dog Run Trailhead
  • Northeast Trailhead
  • Boneyard Trailhead
Carrizo Trailhead

Carrizo Creek Trail

DIFFICULTY: Easy

1.6 mile loop hike to Carrizo Creek Dam and beyond to Indian dwelling sites and pictographs. This trail is found by crossing over the railroad tracks and following the karins that mark the way. If you are interested in discovering the Indian dwelling sites and pictographs, this trail is best done with a guide who can point out sites of interest.

Image
Image
Carrizo Trailhead

San Diego Railroad Trail

DIFFICULTY: Easy

The trip to the Goat Canyon Trestle Bridge is a 19.5 mile round-trip hike. If this distance is too long, you are free to turn around whenever you wish. Bring a flashlight for the tunnels, not only because of the darkness but also to see rattlesnakes if they are hiding out in the shade of the tunnel. You can also explore several abandoned passenger cars parked along the way. As an important safety note, many of the railroad ties have rotted away and the trestles have gaps in the bridgeway.

Carrizo Trailhead

Old Carrizo Gorge Road Trail

DIFFICULTY: Moderate

3.8 mile loop. Hike the old extension of the Carrizo Gorge Road to a spur trail on the right which takes you to The Chimney at Camp Sizzle, which is the first of many old railroad camp sites. Back to the old road, either take the next left to junction with the San Diego & Arizona Eastern Railroad. You have the option to turn around or turn left and follow the railroad back to the resort.

Image
Image
Carrizo Trailhead

Squaw Ridge Nature Trail

DIFFICULTY: Easy

0.8 mile loop. From the Carrizo Trailhead, take the Carrizo Creek trail to the signed beginning of the Nature Trail. The trail gently climbs to the tip of Squaw Ridge and follows the undulation ridge around and down to the Dog Park Trailhead. Pleasant views of the surrounding area with exquisite rock formations.

Dog Run Trailhead

Squaw Peak Trail

DIFFICULTY: Easy

0.8 mile loop. Hike to Indian dwelling sites with beautiful rock formations. Once you arrive at Squaw Peak, you will be delighted with the 360 degree views of the resort, railroad tracks and mountains beyond. Continue on the trail to Lone Tiger Wash. Bare to the left at the wash (dry creek bed) which leads you down a natural staircase of an ancient waterfall. As the falls have been dry for over a century, the wind and water have sculpted the eroded granite to a smooth finish. At the bottom of the dry falls, you will pass through a rare riparian grove to the Old Carrizo Gorge Road. Take a left and head up the mild incline up to the top of the road. At the ridge, you will find four corners. Go straight or right, as both will take you back to the start of the Carrizo Trailhead.

Image
Image
Dog Run Trailhead

Coyote Trail

DIFFICULTY: Easy

0.2 mile loop. Short trail around a low hill near the dog park. Great option for a nice short hike to enjoy the sunset or relaxing morning walk with the dogs.

Dog Run Trailhead

Lone Tiger Dry Fall

DIFFICULTY: Moderate

1.0 mile round trip. Hike to a large dry fall and grotto. The hike is mostly along washes with some cross country hiking. As you approach the dry fall, some rock scrambling becomes necessary. The dry fall is at least thirty feet tall within a well-shaded grotto. Please be aware there is a steep drop off at the end of the dry falls. DO NOT attempt to climb down, return back the way you came.

Image
Image
Dog Run Trailhead

Prospector’s Hill

DIFFICULTY: Moderate

1.7 mile loop. Hike to the mine shafts and a couple of dry falls. Follow the Lone Tiger Dry Fall trail to the first drainage on the right. Climb past a small dry fall to the barbed-wire fence. Beyond, follow the next drainage upstream to the trail on the left. Walk along the faint trail following a ridge high above lone Tiger Wash. When the trail reaches the was there will be two options. The first option is to hike up the canyon to where an old jeep trail dips into the wash on the right. Follow the jeep trail to the Northeast Trail junction and head back to the Northeast Trailhead. The second option is to hike down Lone Tiger Wash over a series of small dry falls with boulder scrambling involved. Just above the Lone Tiger Dry Fall, you can climb up out of the wash to rejoin the Prospector Hill Trail for the hike back to the Dog Park Trailhead. Do not follow the wash past lone Tiger Dry Fall, as it has a very dangerous drop off. Be safe and return the way you came on the trail, back to the resort.

Northeast Trailhead

Northeast Trail

DIFFICULTY: Moderate

1.6 mile round trip. Awesome rock formations, natural caves and good views. Turn around either at the jeep trail junction or at Lone Tiger Wash. There are options to take several other trails along the way.

Image
Image
Northeast Trailhead

Big Chief Canyon

DIFFICULTY: Moderate

1.8 mile round trip. Hike to Native American morteros and seasonal streams, the route takes you to a juniper grove at the base of a dry fall. Take the Northeast Trail to the top of the first ridge and turn right. The path winds through a boulder field, so some rock scrambling is required. Beyond, past a series of cascades where you will find the morteros, the way winds through a high desert valley to a narrows. Pass the narrows on the left around a small hill, then turn right on the Broken Earth Trail. Alternatively, you can boulder-hop your way through the rocky cleft of Big Chief Wash. Beyond the narrows, the wash becomes rocky until you reach the juniper grove. Turn around at the dry fall or continue on the Broken Earth Trail for a longer hike.

Northeast Trailhead

Cactus Loop Trail

DIFFICULTY: Moderate to Difficult

Three hour round trip hike. As this is a backcountry trail, exact distance is hard to determine. Take the Northeast Trail to the top of the second ridge and turn right. The Cactus Loop Trail winds its way through boulders to a plateau. Here, the trail loops its way around the edge of the cactus-strewn plateau. There is an option to proceed south to the top of a rocky hill for a view of the resort. Return the way you came or brave the Bighorn Sheep Drop off, which plunges down the west side of the plateau and back to the Northeast Trail.

Image
Image
Temple Peak Trailhead

Temple Peak Loop Trail

DIFFICULTY: Moderate to Difficult

1.1 mile loop. Hike to Indian dwellings, pictographs and wind carved caves. Small incline and boulders to cross. Moderate climb up to Temple Peak Saddle. Easiest way is to take the loop counter-clockwise. Spectacular views all around. Temple Peak trail is a wonderful day hike for just about anyone. Please note that the incline is steep on the way up and after the saddle, gradual to steep down. For those who seek adventure, experienced hikers can head towards Temple Peak and take the rope up to the top.

Temple Peak Trailhead

Temple Peak Trailhead

DIFFICULTY: Easy

Take the Temple Peak Loop Trail counter-clockwise. At the top of the pass into Pumice Rock Canyon, stay straight where the Loop Trail turn left. Follow the path through the gentle valley of upper Pumice Canyon (only one steep section to get around a boulder choke) and cross the divide to the next drainage. Shortly thereafter, you will notice a flat platform on the left. Walk over to the platform and look behind a large boulder. There you will find the Mystery Mine. Explore the mine and return via the Temple Peak Loop Trail.

Image
Image
Temple Peak Trailhead

Dead Sheep Shortcut Trail

DIFFICULTY: Extreme

1.2 mile loop. Follow the Temple Peak Loop Trail Clockwise over the shoulder of the first ridge. Where the Temple Peak Loop Trail drops after the ridge (close to the bottom of the Broken Earth Wash), watch for a trail heading off to the left. From here this route drops down to the bottom of Broken Earth Wash and follows the bed of he wash over a few small dry falls and past some boulder chokes to where the main wash make a hard left turn. Follow the main wash but keep and eye out to where the path starts angling up the right-hand slope. The path quickly gains elevation and makes several sharp switchbacks before finally ending up on the Broken Earth Rail near where it crosses the Boulder Wash. You may take the Broken Earth Rail back to the Temple Peak Loop Trail and return to the resort.

Temple Peak Trailhead

Broken Earth Trail

DIFFICULTY: Moderate to Extreme

3.0 mile loop. Take the Temple Peak Loop Trail to the Temple Peak Saddle. The Broken Earth Trail begins heading away from Temple Peak. After passing a few wind caves, the trail switchbacks over the steep shoulder of a ridge and follows high above Broken Earth Canyon. Stay left at the Back of Boulders Trail junction, down a quick switchback and continue to where the trail dips into the Basket of Boulders drainage. Here the trail steeply climbs up to the top of a ridge, then contours over to Cactus Meadow Valley. There you will meet the second junction of the Basket of Boulders Trail. Stay left, follow the Broken Earth Trail to the top of the drainage and then head down the next drainage to DeAnza Wash. Cross the wash and traverse a wide valley around to another drainage coming in on the right. Follow this drainage over a small dry fall leading to a divide. The trail follows a series of small rocky gullies down to Big Chief Dry Fall. The route follows Big Chief Canyon Trail to where that trail turns first right, then left around a small hill. Where the Big Chief Canyon Trail turns left, head straight to the top of another divide. The trail then follows the next drainage over down to Lone Wolf Wash where it meets the old jeep trail. Just beyond is the junction with the Northeast Trail. Follow the Northeast Trail back to the Northeast Trailhead. Best done with a map, compass, combined with good navigation skills.

Image
Image
Temple Peak Trailhead

Basket of Boulders Scramble

DIFFICULTY: Extreme

2.0 mile loop. Take the Temple Peak Loop Trail to Temple Peak Saddle. Turn left onto the Broken Earth Trail. Proceed to just before the short switchback near the obvious cliff. Here, the junction with the Basket of Boulders Trail heads right. Follow the Basket of Boulders Trail to the top of the cliff and enjoy the wonderful view of the De Anza Resort. Beyond the overlook, the trail heads uphill towards the western ramparts of the Basket of Boulders. When the trail reaches the rocks, the Basket of Boulders Scramble begins. Follow the blazes. This is the easiest way through the Basket of Boulders. The blazes look like footprint, with a sun symbol denoting left or right turns. They will lead you first along the western edge of the ramparts until you get to the Basket of Boulders drainage. Follow the drainage upstream into the Basket of Boulders proper. Feel free to explore and take the side trip to The Prow (see below). The blazes will then take you on a rougher scramble around the northern rim of the Basket to reach a high stone ledge. This ledge leads through a gap in the eastern ramparts of the Basket until you reach a sharp cleft that drops you down to the exit. Once you are through this cleft, you are back on the Basket of Boulders Trail. The trail follows left along a ridge before dropping back down into Cactus Meadow. There the trail hits another junction with the Broken Earth Trail. Turn left on the Broken Earth Trail and follow it back to the Temple Peak Saddle to return to the resort.

Temple Peak Trailhead

Basket of Boulders to the Prow

DIFFICULTY: Extreme

This is a 950 ft. side-trip to the aforementioned Basket of Boulders Scramble. This route is not blazed so a greater ability to navigate is required. Greater caution is recommended if you venture off of the described route and onto the boulder fields. Follow the directions given in the “Basket of Boulders Scramble” until you enter the Basket itself. At the point where the blazed trail leaves the drainage channel and heads northeast, continue southeast up the drainage towards the obvious boulder in the middle of the valley. Before you reach this boulder, you will see a flat slab of rock barely poking out of the ground on your right. Turn and head for the slab. From this slab, you will see a line of light-colored granite slabs climbing out of the valley. Follow these slabs roughly south, picking your way carefully around boulders that have fallen from above. At the crest, you should be looking down at The Prow, a horn of granite rock at the end of the line of slabs. Pick your way carefully down to “The Prow.” Beyond, the downward slope is a jumble of broken boulders. Go no further. The view from “The Prow” is pristine. Enjoy the view and return the way you came.

Image
Image
Boneyard Trailhead

Lower Temple Peak Canyon

DIFFICULTY: Easy

0.6 mile loop. Behind the resorts’ B section, there are two canyons. The left-hand canyon is broad and sandy at the beginning but it soon narrows down. Just past the narrowest section of the canyon is a path which angles up the hillside to the left. This leads to the road going up to the water storage tanks. You can visit the water tanks for a view of the resort before following the road down to the Temple Peak Trailhead.

Boneyard Trailhead

Pumice Rock Canyon

DIFFICULTY: Moderate

1.2 mile loop. Hike the volcanic colored canyon located behind the resort’s B section. The canyon winds through the remains of a pyroclastic flow from Round Mountain. After climbing over several dry falls, you will reach the Mystery Mine Trail. Turn left to return to the resort via the Mystery Mine and Temple Peak Loop Trails.

Image

Call us at
619-766-4301

Email us at
Stay@DeAnzaSprings.com

Contact us today to plan your next getaway in the gorgeous settings of DeAnza Springs Resort.

Call us at
619-766-4301

Email us at
Stay@DeAnzaSprings.com

Contact us today to plan your next getaway in the gorgeous settings of DeAnza Springs Resort.

DeAnza Springs Logo
DeAnza Springs Logo

1951 Carrizo Gorge Rd.

Jacumba, CA 91934

619-766-4301

Stay@DeAnzaSprings.com

1951 Carrizo Gorge Rd.

Jacumba, CA 91934

619-766-4301

Stay@DeAnzaSprings.com

Site designed and hosted by:

One Stone Web 

Site designed and hosted by:

One Stone Web

AANR Logo
AANR Logo
TNS Logo